Miscellany

texts, images and artifacts of Medieval Europe

Free and Online College History Courses

spaceadmiraldee:

History of the World to 1500 (Columbia University)
This course presents and at the same time critiques a narrative world history from prehistoric times to 1500. The purpose of the course is to convey an understanding of how this rapidly growing field of history is being approached at three different levels: the narrative textbook level, the theoretical-conceptual level, and through discussion sections, the research level.”

History of the World Since 1500 (Columbia University)
This course presents and at the same time critiques a narrative world history after 1500 CE. The purpose of the course is to convey an understanding of how this rapidly growing field of history is being approached at three different levels: the narrative textbook level, the theoretical-conceptual level, and through discussion sections, the research level.”

Introduction to Ancient Greek History (Yale)
This is an introductory course in Greek history tracing the development of Greek civilization as manifested in political, intellectual, and creative achievements from the Bronze Age to the end of the classical period. Students read original sources in translation as well as the works of modern scholars.”

The Early Middle Ages (Yale)
Major developments in the political, social, and religious history of Western Europe from the accession of Diocletian to the feudal transformation. Topics include the conversion of Europe to Christianity, the fall of the Roman Empire, the rise of Islam and the Arabs, the “Dark Ages,” Charlemagne and the Carolingian renaissance, and the Viking and Hungarian invasions.”

The Crusades (University of Houston)
The Crusades with Professor Sally Vaughn of The University of Houston covers the origins, development, and results of the crusades from the eleventh through the thirteenth centuries.”

Early Modern England: Tudors and Stuarts (Yale)
This course is intended to provide an up-to-date introduction to the development of English society between the late fifteenth and the early eighteenth centuries. Particular issues addressed in the lectures will include: the changing social structure; households; local communities; gender roles; economic development; urbanization; religious change from the Reformation to the Act of Toleration; the Tudor and Stuart monarchies; rebellion, popular protest and civil war; witchcraft; education, literacy and print culture; crime and the law; poverty and social welfare; the changing structures and dynamics of political participation and the emergence of parliamentary government.”

Science, Magic, and Religion (UCLA)
Professor Courtenay Raia lectures on science and religion as historical phenomena that have evolved over time. Examines the earlier mind-set before 1700 when into science fitted elements that came eventually to be seen as magical. The course also question how Western cosmologies became “disenchanted.” Magical tradition transformed into modern mysticisms is also examined as well as the political implications of these movements. Includes discussion concerning science in totalitarian settings as well as “big science” during the Cold War.”

The American Revolution (Yale)
The American Revolution entailed some remarkable transformations—converting British colonists into American revolutionaries, and a cluster of colonies into a confederation of states with a common cause — but it was far more complex and enduring then the fighting of a war. As John Adams put it, “The Revolution was in the Minds of the people… before a drop of blood was drawn at Lexington”—and it continued long past America’s victory at Yorktown. This course will examine the Revolution from this broad perspective, tracing the participants’ shifting sense of themselves as British subjects, colonial settlers, revolutionaries, and Americans.”

The Victorians: Culture and Experience (Gresham College)
This course of lectures looks at the Victorians not just in Britain but in Europe and the wider world.  ’Victorian’ has come to stand for a particular set of values, perceptions and experiences, many of which were shared by people in a variety of different countries, from Russia to America, Spain to Scandinavia and reflected in the literature and culture of the nineteenth century, up to the outbreak of the First World War.  The focus of the lectures will be on identifying and analysing six key areas of the Victorian experience, looking at them in international perspective. The lectures will be illustrated and the visual material will form a key element in the presentations.  Throughout the series, we will be asking how far, in an age of growing nationalism and class conflict, the experiences of the Victorian era were common to different classes and countries across Europe and how far the political dominance of Britain, the world superpower of the day, was reflected in the spread of British culture and values to other parts of the world.”

lunacylover:

Archeological finds from Pomorze/Pomerania region [x] [x].

Zaginione - Ocalone. Szczecińska kolekcja starożytności pomorskich”.

  1. Amber bear figurine found near Słupsk. Mesolithic/Neolithic.
  2. A decorated object carved from deer antlers, called magic staff, found in the Odra river in Szczecin-Podjuchy. Mesolithic. [closeup]
  3. Gold armlet found in Letnino, Pyrzyce County [powiat pyrzycki]. Bronze Age, c. 950-750 BC.
  4. Various bronze treasuries found in Karkowo. Bronze Age, c. 750-450/400 BC.
  5. Bronze necklaces from the Karkowo treasures. Bronze Age, c. 750-450/400 BC.
  6. Silver fibulaes, gilded, found in Świelino. 5th century AD.
  7. Silver dercorative objects from Piaski-Dramino. Early Middle Ages, c. 950 AD.

[photographs: G. Solecki]

dictionnaire-infernal:

Vincent of Beauvais, Speculum historiale. c. 1455

dictionnaire-infernal:

Vincent of Beauvais, Speculum historiale. c. 1455

dictionnaire-infernal:

Demons on Notre Dame Cathedral. 13th century

dictionnaire-infernal:

Demons on Notre Dame Cathedral. 13th century

nihtegale:

Comfrey and Self Heal, 1280-1310

nihtegale:

Comfrey and Self Heal, 1280-1310

(Source: bl.uk)

design-is-fine:

Beaker, 1425-1525. Germany. Clear green glass. Via V&A
The so called krautstrunk was one of the most popular types of drinking glasses in central Europe, during the 15th and the first half of the 16th century. 

design-is-fine:

Beaker, 1425-1525. Germany. Clear green glass. Via V&A

The so called krautstrunk was one of the most popular types of drinking glasses in central Europe, during the 15th and the first half of the 16th century. 

centuriespast:

The earliest unfinished European painting on display at the Met right now, in Gallery 640, is a real knockout: “Virgin and Child With Saints” by a Flemish artist referred to as the Ghent Painter (who might be Hugo van der Goes or Jean Hey). This exquisite oil-on-wood image demonstrates one of the stranger ways that a work can be, or in this case become, unfinished. Completed around 1472 in the meticulously realist style perfected by Jan van Eyck (1390-1441), the painting was modified in the early 17th century to depict the marriage of Henry VII to Elizabeth of York. The Virgin and Child in the center and St. John the Baptist to the left of them were scraped off and replaced, respectively, with a central view into a cathedral and the bride. The lavishly dressed St. Louis (himself a king) on the far right became Henry with a few adjustments in crown and gown.
The painting, which entered the Met’s collection in 1889, was restored in 1983; the added images and details were removed, revealing the nearly intact ink drawing of the Virgin and Child and partial sketches of St. John. Having been finished and refinished, the restored work is now unfinished, providing a glimpse of the preparatory precision of Flemish painters, and also looking, on first sight, very much like a collage.
— Roberta Snith, NYT 1/10/14

centuriespast:

The earliest unfinished European painting on display at the Met right now, in Gallery 640, is a real knockout: “Virgin and Child With Saints” by a Flemish artist referred to as the Ghent Painter (who might be Hugo van der Goes or Jean Hey). This exquisite oil-on-wood image demonstrates one of the stranger ways that a work can be, or in this case become, unfinished. Completed around 1472 in the meticulously realist style perfected by Jan van Eyck (1390-1441), the painting was modified in the early 17th century to depict the marriage of Henry VII to Elizabeth of York. The Virgin and Child in the center and St. John the Baptist to the left of them were scraped off and replaced, respectively, with a central view into a cathedral and the bride. The lavishly dressed St. Louis (himself a king) on the far right became Henry with a few adjustments in crown and gown.

The painting, which entered the Met’s collection in 1889, was restored in 1983; the added images and details were removed, revealing the nearly intact ink drawing of the Virgin and Child and partial sketches of St. John. Having been finished and refinished, the restored work is now unfinished, providing a glimpse of the preparatory precision of Flemish painters, and also looking, on first sight, very much like a collage.

— Roberta Snith, NYT 1/10/14

(via bookeofhowrs)

mediumaevum:

Merovingian fibulas (gold, garnets and glass paste and precious stones)

theglobalbook:

Gospel passages inscribed on the wall of a medieval crypt at Old Dongola. 
More info here.

theglobalbook:

Gospel passages inscribed on the wall of a medieval crypt at Old Dongola. 

More info here.

adokal:

French ivory Virgin and Child, end of 13th c., Louvre.
source

adokal:

French ivory Virgin and Child, end of 13th c., Louvre.

source

erikkwakkel:

Frankenstein page
These two medieval fragments with musical notation were cut from a single page, which was severed because the parchment was recycled to support a bookbinding. During restoration in modern times the pair was stitched back together. Two half songs became one again, an interrupted melody was unpaused. And a Frankenstein page was born.
Pic: Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, BPL 3254 (15th century)

erikkwakkel:

Frankenstein page

These two medieval fragments with musical notation were cut from a single page, which was severed because the parchment was recycled to support a bookbinding. During restoration in modern times the pair was stitched back together. Two half songs became one again, an interrupted melody was unpaused. And a Frankenstein page was born.

Pic: Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, BPL 3254 (15th century)

medievalpoc:

Anonymous Bohemian Illuminator

Title Illustration for The Song of Solomon

Bohemia (c. 1420)

Illumination on Parchment

 Krumlovsky Sbornik (“Krumlov Compilation”) (490 pp.), p. 256: illustration of a verse from Song of Songs—-“I am black but comely.” (Shapely black woman with reddish blond hair in a long white dress with red and blue designs on it.)

The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

demonagerie:

British Library, Add MS 42130, detail of f. 152v. Gallican Psalter (‘the Luttrell Psalter’) with calendar and additional material (1325-1340)

demonagerie:

British Library, Add MS 42130, detail of f. 152v. Gallican Psalter (‘the Luttrell Psalter’) with calendar and additional material (1325-1340)

medievalvisions:

Chalice of Abbot Suger of St. Denis. Sardonyx cup dating to the 1st or 2nd century BCE; mounting, gilding, and ornamentation from c. 1137 - 1140 CE.

medievalvisions:

Chalice of Abbot Suger of St. Denis. Sardonyx cup dating to the 1st or 2nd century BCE; mounting, gilding, and ornamentation from c. 1137 - 1140 CE.

centuriespast:

Unknown- Illuminated Medieval Manuscript
France, 1440
Canton Museum of Art

centuriespast:

Unknown- Illuminated Medieval Manuscript

France, 1440

Canton Museum of Art

(via bookeofhowrs)